David Sheldrick

Shooting Chanel in Cambridge

Back in May I produced and shot a series of images with Chinese actress Kwei Lun Mei in the streets of Cambridge.

The production started with visiting Cambridge to figure out the lay of the land, and trying to designate key spots for different looks. During the location scout we also gathered all the relevant production information we could, such as relevant contacts for shooting permission, where is okay for public shooting and where is off limits. Good restaurants for the team to eat and transit times between each location.

 

 

 

We had to visit Cambridge twice to create a solid production schedule for the day but we had eventually created a route which meant that each location was only 20-50 m away from each other and throughout the day so it was only a matter of just moving small distances between looks.

On the shoot day I carried only one Siros L 800 light mounted on an M stand with an extra battery and a silver umbrella so that we weren’t carrying unnecessary weight with us and the modifier was collapsible and easy to  transport.

 
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In hindsight we should have used a larger heavier stand as the umbrella modifier would pick up any strong gusts of wind and almost tipped over on multiple occasions, but thankfully we managed to avoid any serious damage.

For the editorial we where featuring the Chanel F/W17 collection and mixing it with more casual elements to make it a more street ready look. Kwei Lun Mei was fantastic to work with, as a professional actress she would stay in character as a quirky, fun loving girl the whole time, making my job a simple matter of following her and sometimes positioning her into the frame.

There is a huge difference when working with an actor and a model, I find when working with actors or actresses its best to leave direction to a minimum or to  not interrupt them too much and let them simply occupy the space whilst in character, too much direction can sometimes be detrimental for your sitter.

Most of the times I would use the Siros L 800 as a very soft fill or to counteract the sun. I wanted to maintain an authentic natural light feel, but still have the ability to tame the natural light subtly just to throw in more detail to under exposed areas if  necessary.

 

 

 

Since starting to use the Siros L 800 light it really is an amazingly powerful & versatile piece of kit, even just a single light is an amazing addition to any location project and is much less hassle to use on set than the Move Kit. I would recommend the Siros L 800 as a key piece of equipment for any location shooter, and is well worth the investment.

I look forward to using this light in particular this summer as the weather turns for the better and more location work can  happen.

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